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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 5: (a) An elderly patient presented with haemoptysis and breathlessness. Axial computed tomography lung window demonstrates patchy areas of ground-glass opacities with interlobular and intralobular septal thickening – giving “crazy paving pattern” in the right upper lobe and also in the bilateral lower lobes. Imaging findings were consistent with diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. (b) Patient presented to the casualty with acute-onset of chest pain and cough. Axial computed tomography image lung window demonstrates a patch of consolidation in the subpleural location with central ground-glass opacities – “atoll sign” (reverse halo sign) in the right upper lobe was consistent with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Significant resolution was seen with corticosteroid treatment. (c) Selected axial computed tomography image lung window shows diffuse randomly distributed tiny parenchymal nodules “miliary pattern” in this elderly female patient on chemotherapy presenting with a new onset of cough, breathlessness, and fever since a month. Overall findings are in favour of infective etiology – miliary tuberculosis. Sputum was positive for acid-fast bacilli. The patient is on ATT and follow- up (d) Selected axial sections of CT chest lung window with bilateral perihilar ground glass opacities multiple pulmonary cysts with relative peripheral and subpleural sparing. No evidence of pleural effusion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Overall findings were in favour of pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia which is a common opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The patient presented with sudden loss of consciousness and breathlessness and workup revealed HIV positive status with low CD4 counts 28 cells/mm3

Figure 5: (a) An elderly patient presented with haemoptysis and breathlessness. Axial computed tomography lung window demonstrates patchy areas of ground-glass opacities with interlobular and intralobular septal thickening – giving “crazy paving pattern” in the right upper lobe and also in the bilateral lower lobes. Imaging findings were consistent with diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. (b) Patient presented to the casualty with acute-onset of chest pain and cough. Axial computed tomography image lung window demonstrates a patch of consolidation in the subpleural location with central ground-glass opacities – “atoll sign” (reverse halo sign) in the right upper lobe was consistent with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Significant resolution was seen with corticosteroid treatment. (c) Selected axial computed tomography image lung window shows diffuse randomly distributed tiny parenchymal nodules “miliary pattern” in this elderly female patient on chemotherapy presenting with a new onset of cough, breathlessness, and fever since a month. Overall findings are in favour of infective etiology – miliary tuberculosis. Sputum was positive for acid-fast bacilli. The patient is on ATT and follow- up (d) Selected axial sections of CT chest lung window with bilateral perihilar ground glass opacities multiple pulmonary cysts with relative peripheral and subpleural sparing. No evidence of pleural effusion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Overall findings were in favour of pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia which is a common opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The patient presented with sudden loss of consciousness and breathlessness and workup revealed HIV positive status with low CD4 counts 28 cells/mm<sup>3</sup>